Soar as a Certified Relationship Coach

Soar as a Certified Relationship Coach

If you have a passion for empowering, educating, and inspiring couples, then becoming a soulful relationship coach may be the next greatest action for you.

Some are in crisis, they need to improve their communication skills, and others want to grow an excellent relationship. Whatever the specific need is, you can help provide solutions.

A relationship coach is a coach that helps couples to manifest a happier, more fulfilled, and whole relationship. A soulful relationship coach also inspires them to connect on a deeper soul level. He or she provides the structure for the couple to set relationship goals and achieve them.

We have the choice to do something memorable for others. Could becoming a relationship coach be your calling? If you feel led to this specialized coaching area, then it is your time to move forward. Someone somewhere wants what you have to give. You can package your passion and creativity into excellent coaching services and programs and change lives, relationships, and the world.

Many couples are not sure how to go to the next level of relationship success, and many couples seek someone to help them with relationship guidance. As long as there are relationships, there will be a need for those who serve in relationships. Relationship guidance is a valuable and desirable opportunity for couples. You can unleash your inner gifts as a relationship expert and catapult your life personally, professionally, and financially.

JUST ASK MAXX (THE RELATIONSHIP GURU)

JUST ASK MAXX (THE RELATIONSHIP GURU)

Dear Maxx, I think I am in love with my boss! I am already married, and so is he.

There is another position open in the company, and I have been offered it.

Taking it will add so much to my career, but it will mean no longer seeing the man  I have come to love. He has asked me not to take this new opportunity, and though we have not yet discussed our feelings,  the attraction between us is obvious. He has tried to address our feelings with me, but I was so scared I shut him down.

Oh, what should I do, Maxx?

There are red flags and no green lights!

You are married, and so is he. You work together, he is your boss. Office romances never work, you know that. It is a recipe for disaster and disappointment.

Why would you do this? Turn down so m eth ing te s te d and true for an experience sure to end badly? What about your career? Throw away a chance to grow and gain in the company for a literal bad romance?

See what is right and wrong for you; honor your first commitment. Know happiness with your husband, feel fulfillment with your family. It is never wise to throw the baby out with the bathwater or your life out for lust.

Just ask Maxx

Hello Maxx, only recently started dating a man, he was Polyamorous but has agreed to be Monogamous.

At least…that’ what he has told me.

There have so many green flags…but there is still this one redone! Any advice from you is much appreciated.

Hello Monogamous, thank you for getting in touch with me.

I get it; you are not 100% sure where you stand with this man and all the cautions are filling your head.

Please understand you do not have all the information, so you are not confident that he is able to be in a one to one relationship with you. It is alright to be concerned. A person cannot go from Poly to Mono overnight, it has to be a  willing choice for himself, not just you.

To be Poly means extra people, it means extra experiences and this choice means evolving personally. It is not just about sex; though you are forgiven for having trouble with that idea. There is a distinct difference between Polygamy and Swinging.

This is a huge change for him, so please allow yourselves to be friends for 90 days to determine where you both are and if he really is ready to make the change for you. Work on your trust issues and give this a proper chance.

Just ask Maxx

Hello Maxx, This is a long, long story short We dated for about four years recently I thought everything was fine honestly I was waiting to get proposed to or wanting to move in with me.

He does this thing when he gets distant for like a week, then all of a sudden he’s fine, and everything goes back to normal every once in a while, so I always think maybe he needs his space sometimes, which is fine I understand.

Well, he started doing this, then we were supposed to go to the beach together and two days before he said he decided its better if he doesn’t go with me. My son, well, I got mad and was like what is going on.

You can’t do this well that opened the gates apparently, and he went off about my son. He can’t handle him (mind you he is five at the time we got together he was already in the picture the whole time) all of a sudden he can’t handle to be around him.

Then he started going off on me about when we were first together how I was still talking to my ex and hooked up with him honestly I don’t remember anymore I’ve moved on from that point in my life I was baffled and messed up when I met him.

I’ve admitted that I was confused, and I don’t remember what happened, then he thinks I don’t know on purpose as I don’t want to tell him the truth. Still, I just have purposely pushed that part out of my head that I don’t remember because I’ve changed myself from that time in my life and have grown from it now its held over my head now four years later?

He gives me excuses, but I don’t know if he comes up with things to get me to say okay and let him go or what’s going on. He won’t open up to me anymore, and he used to I don’t know what to do; he now has broken up with me.

Still, one week, he wants to talk to me. He seems like he wants me apart of his life the next week, he ignores me or looks like he wants nothing to do with me I’m so confused at this point, and heartbroken I’ve never felt this broken about someone I don’t know to cut all ties and move on or fight for what I think I want to have with him.

Dear Heartbroken, Thank you for sharing your heart’s troubles.

There are so many moving parts in your situation, but at the end of the day, your child is the most important thing.

At this time, you need him to give you clear and direct answers to your questions. Why has he broken up with you? What is his exact issue with your son? Why is he bringing up the past? Why is he coming in and out of your life?

If those questions can’t be answered, you both have no future and no relationship. You need to set boundaries and inform him that he can’t come in and out of your life and leave you in limbo. At this time, he appears no longer interested in having a relationship with you.

You can’t fight for a relationship that doesn’t exist. It would help if you accepted what is and that he is no longer interested. Please take a step back and focus on your child. That is where all your energy needs to be at this time.

Anything else is a waste of your time. I hope this gives you clarity and starts towards closure.

Just ask Maxx

Hello Maxx, I am a thirty-seven year old and, until recently, a virgin.

I started dating a man, we had such a great connection, and I felt so loved by him, that after nine days of this amazing closeness when he asked me for money to help pay his rent, I sent it.

He told me he didn’t get it, so I asked him for his landlord’s information so I could send it directly.  It turns out; he gave me an alias. I have sent over 3,000 dollars and lost something very precious to me, and I still dream about this man every day.

Please help me, have I been Catfished?

Dear Catfished, I am so sad to hear that and so sorry to say that this happens a lot in the world of social media and dating.

You have been deceived, and I won’t go into the red flags but please be wiser in the future.

Your virginity was a great gift and you did give it to someone you trusted. What I ask is that you give yourself more time to get to know someone first.

Nine days is not enough time to share yourself or your bank account.

Love yourself.

Just ask Maxx.

IT’S THE MOST WONDERFUL TIME OF THE YEAR

IT’S THE MOST WONDERFUL TIME OF THE YEAR

Unless You Are Single! As a Relationship Coach, I work with many men and women who are going through relationship transitions in their lives.

Whether caused by divorce, death of a  loved one, or just a season of change, each Fall, I hear a common thread from my newer clients, “I just don’t know how to face the holidays alone.” Whether on the driving or receiving side of a relationship split, the first holidays often seem unsurmountable.

I hear clients struggle with how they feel about holiday party invitations – should they attend alone, will their friends invite them or their ex, would it be easier just to avoid visiting and avoid questions?

They often express anxiety over having to share the kids on such special days, how it leaves them feeling abandoned, how they are concerned about being upstaged with gifts by their ex, how the expense of the holidays causes its strain.

There is also the general loneliness they anticipate will be exasperated by a season when others are experiencing joy. All of these feelings are real concerns and are rooted in fear of the unknown. Facing any transition in life can be overwhelming, and the holidays are a time when one could have arising feelings of uncertainty.

Let’s explore ways to ease your journey in what may seem like a “not so wonderful time of the year.” Take a realistic approach to the days ahead.  It’s natural to mourn over the loss of what used to be, but you will find it easier to move forward when you accept the fact that things will be different.

Don’t just jump ahead and assume all the holidays will be stressful, instead take one holiday or event at a  time. Be realistic about the season and separate your feelings from facts. It is effortless to want a picture-perfect Hallmark Movie holiday; however, most people’s experience is far more like National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation with flaws, failures, and more calamity than calm.

Be realistic that this year will be different, but that difference can be a rewarding experience.   Face them with a positive mind-frame and avoid isolation. It’s very easy to avoid social interaction when you are going through a relational transition; however, the holidays are an excellent time to change your mindset.

Focus on the things you have always loved most about the holidays. Keep up those traditions even if it means modifying the way you have done them in the past. Make sure you put up your tree or favorite Menorah. If baking cookies in the past brought you joy, host a cookie exchange, or invite an elderly neighbor to bake with you.

Pass on traditions to your children, and get them involved, explain why these things mean something to you. Avoid doing everything alone by shopping with friends or hosting a wrapping party. Focus on the good that’s happening in your life and marvel in your new independence, cultivating gratitude in your unique experiences.

If applicable, lean on your faith and even explore new traditions from your faith or ancestry. By keeping your focus on the positive things, and staying engaged throughout the holidays, you will be better prepared to handle the bumps when uncertainty surfaces.

You may even find ways to enjoy your new independence in the season. The important thing is to give yourself the gift of community. Focus on eternal things, instead of your situation. It is easy to get caught up by the many changes happening around you.

Don’t dwell on the past but look forward to what new happenings are emerging in your life. Remember the holidays are more about people than they are about things. Try not to allow financial pressures to burden you, instead make a budget and keep within it.

Give of yourself and your time if your resources are not as plentiful. Avoid feeling guilty if you can’t give gifts and find ways to create memories with people, which are more valuable than material items. Be patient with yourself as you work to change your focus away from your situation to others.

Reach out to others and find ways to bring joy into both of your lives. Remember, the greatest gift we can give others is ourselves, which will also fill us with joy. Try to make new traditions with people around you and fill your time.

Some find volunteering fulfilling; others may host a gift exchange with neighbors. Allow yourself happiness.  It may seem unnatural to be happy in your circumstances, but it will also build hope for your future.

Use this season to set a new course for your future, permitting yourself to celebrate in ways that bring you joy! I recall one client on her first holiday season alone. Her children were spending Christmas with her ex, and her family was all out of state. Instead of resigning herself to lying in bed all day in misery, she sought others in the same boat.

What she realized was there were quite a few parents she knew in the same boat on Christmas. She offered to host a “Friends without Family” Christmas Dinner. Setting her best china, she asked friends to each bring a dish to share and two identical gifts, one to exchange and one to give.

After their gift exchange and a satisfying meal, the group headed to a nearby city to hand out plates of leftovers and the extra gifts wrapped to the homeless. What could have been a handful of lonely people quickly became a day of cheer and giving?

By focusing on happiness, she was able to bring joy and happiness to not only friends but some unexpected homeless. What stood out to me about this client as she was ready to embrace the season with a realistic approach; she kept a positive outlook avoiding isolation, and she focused on others rather than her circumstances.

Not allowing her situation to overwhelm her, she was able to find happiness in the changes around her. In many ways, the most important lesson is to gift yourself the permission to be happy in the most beautiful time of the year!     Christine Olsen, Info@settlemedown.com SMD Life Coaching   Christine is a Certified Life Coach with nearly ten years of experience.

She is deemed an expert in Transitional Coaching, specializing in relationship, divorce, and hospice coaching. Transitional coaching involves helping clients recognize and navigate change taking place in their lives. Whether the change is by choice or circumstantial, Christine helps clients deal with difficult situations and emotions, while providing navigational tools to thrive in the conditions you face.

Become a Certified Relationship Coach and Soar!

Become a Certified Relationship Coach and Soar!

If you have a passion to empower, educate and inspire couples then becoming a soulful relationship coach may be the next best step for you. Some couples are in crisis, some couples just need to improve their communication skills and other couples want to grow the amazing relationship they have already been blessed with.

Whatever the specific need is you can help provide solutions. A relationship coach is a coach that helps couples to manifest a happier, more fulfilled and whole relationship. A soulful relationship coach also inspires couples to connect on a deeper soul level.

He or she provides the structure for the couple to set relationship goals and achieve them. We have all been purposed to do something amazing for others. Could becoming a relationship coach be your calling?

If you feel led to this specialized coaching area then it is your time to move forward. Someone somewhere needs what you have to offer. You can package your passion and creativity into amazing coaching services and programs and change lives, relationships and the world.

Many couples are not sure how to go to the next level of relationship success and many couples are seeking someone to help them with relationship guidance. As long as there are relationships there will be a need for those who serve in the area of relationships.

Relationship guidance is an essential and desirable opportunity for couples. You can unleash your inner gifts as a relationship expert and catapult your life personally, professionally and financially. There are a world of Coaching Schools to choose from. Just take the first step!